Idaho Teaching Elementary Students ‘Porn Literacy’

Idaho parents are outraged at a program revealed by the Idaho Freedom Foundation in which the state will teach “porn literacy” to elementary students, including how to hide it from their parents.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) is reportedly buying materials from “Education, Training and Research (ETR), which is a progressive nonprofit organization distributing these so-called “porn literacy” programs.

The materials are endorsed by Planned Parenthood and funded by federal grants. ETR is an advocate for teaching these programs that involve instruction on “kink and power, pleasure, sexual identity, sexual acts, and sexual exploration in relation to pornography.”

ETR is described as a group that endorses “queering education.”

The group’s materials profess that pornography is a “required topic” that has to be discussed. This has not been met with applause by many across the nation.

Delano Squires, Research Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, declared the “future of conservatism depends on parents willing to be called bad names” in their fight against those who push “porn, drag queens, and gender confusion on our kids.”

Others have called into question Idaho’s “red state” status, and Inside the Classroom derided the state’s “historic investments in public education.”

One commentator, Adam Coleman of Wrong Speak Publishing, lamented that “these perverts would call us puritans for finding it inappropriate to have elementary school-aged kids watching porn.”

It is shocking that Idaho’s governmental agencies are signed on for this kind of sex education training for the state’s young children. The funding, of course, comes from federal grants that may be rejected by the state.

One ETR-sponsored video proclaims that “being curious about sex or looking at pictures of films of naked bodies or people engaging in sexual behaviors is perfectly normal.” Perhaps to them.

But parents of kids in Idaho and elsewhere feel markedly different from this progressive nonprofit. The group is of course free to endorse what they wish, and it is not surprising that they secured federal funding. What is surprising is that a state such as Idaho would sign on to such madness.